Administrative Burden

Administrative barriers that increase the costs of applying for and maintaining enrollment in public assistance programs discourage participation among eligible families and can impact child development. Costs may include time, money, and psychological distress. By reducing administrative burdens, states can help families access support that promotes positive outcomes for young children. 

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Check out this blog post to learn what administrative burdens are, what impact they have on families and states, and what reducing administrative burden means for families.

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